q&a Archives - GOLD Comedy
marcia belsky

Marcia Belsky is funnier than all those boys in high school

Marcia Belsky is a New York City based stand-up comedian, writer, and musician. She co-wrote Handmaid’s Tale: The Musical with Melissa Stokoski in 2018, which played in New York City and Brooklyn, as well as in Washington D.C. at the John F. Kennedy Center’s Terrace Theater. Recently her musical comedy was featured on Comedy Central’s Taking The Stage, which included her hit song “100 Tampons.”


Describe your worst gig.

Probably the small town gigs in Oregon, anywhere where I have to do comedy in the middle of a bar while TVs are on.

What were you like as a teen? (Did you have comedy #goals? Were you already funny, or not so much?)

As a kid I was obsessed with musical theater and as a teen I was pretending like that wasn’t the case — I think I was already funny but also probably annoying as hell.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

They probably don’t think women are funny because they don’t like women or a world that they’re not used to — I just try to starve them of attention or reaction and am happy to be in a community that doesn’t feel that way.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

It was the only thing I knew I would never quit because I got to be in charge. I think trying to focus on the work and not on the reward helps me stick with it but it can be hard.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Build your own audience and it doesn’t matter who doesn’t get you, only who does.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Any advice that is focused on the hustle and churning out content rather than creative quality.

Favorite heckler or troll?

Someone made an account called Fartcia Smellsky and kept tweeting at me.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

Hate the word comedienne, almost always used by a man in his 50s who is 5 seconds away from booping you on the nose.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

Probably every boy in high school who I would watch absolutely crush and I would think “I am funnier than him.”

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

I always wanted to be consistently funny. I think making a career out of honing that is interesting because now when I’m at parties people find out that I’m a comedian and I feel like I need to tone it down or everyone thinks I’m performing.

What single word always cracks you up?

Butt.


Connect with Marcia on Instagram and Twitter.

 

Not that long ago, Taylor Garron was “homely and strange”

Taylor Garron is a comedian, writer, and actress based in Brooklyn, NY. She has edited at The Onion and Reductress, and her writing has been featured in The New Yorker, Vulture, NY Mag, and on Adult Swim. She has also been featured at The Satire and Humor Festival, San Francisco Sketchfest, Women in Comedy Festival, and on Comedy Central. Watch for her book, co-written with Eva Victor: Look I Bought Plants: And Other Poems about Life and Stuff, coming May 2021!


What were you like as a teen? (Did you have comedy #goals? Were you already funny, or not so much?)

I was homely and strange and an overachiever. And the kind of peer abuse that comes with that is the kind of shit makes you funny.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Don’t be funny for anyone else, be funny for yourself. It’ll show!

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

My eyes roll back into my skull and I involuntarily begin chanting in tongues.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Continuously reminding myself that I was doing this because I enjoyed it, not because it was going to make me famous.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

To make friends who were on my same level and don’t try to network up. Your immediate peers are the ones who will cheer you on/read your pilot/go to your bar shows when you’re starting out. They’re also the ones who will pull you up with them when the time comes.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

That I had to go to a bunch of daytime open mics at those weird comedy clubs around NYU to get any stage time. They didn’t do anything for me, they weren’t fun, and I got sexually harassed a bunch by the mostly (deeply unfunny) male hosts and open micers. All kinds of not worth it!

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

I studied French in high school and college, so it appeals to that side of me. I feel like anyone who calls me a comedienne should immediately have to hand me a croque-madame.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

Being able to disarm people in conversations by being lighthearted off-the-bat or making a joke at my own expense is great for making friends and making people people feel comfortable around me. It also makes customer service people and baristas and servers more inclined to hook you up with freebies or break a policy for you, which is sick.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

It’s the same thing as being a man in comedy except you’re much hotter.

What single word always cracks you up?

Fart, especially if said in a Boston accent. How could it not?


Connect with Taylor on Instagram.

 

Milly Tamarez HOT TAKE: Star Wars is irrelevant and unnecessary

Milly Tamarez is a stand up, and writer based out of Brooklyn, New York. She has written for NPR, Buzzfeed, Reductress, MTV, BRIC, and worked on a collaboration with HBO and The Root. She has been featured on Thrillist, Vice, BET, Flama, Above Average, Univision, and Comedy Central.   She is the one of the creators and producers of Flexx (a satire magazine for people of color) and Diverse as Fuck Festival a festival that highlights diversity in comedy. Milly is also one of the founders of the all women of color improv team Affirmative Action. Her work has been featured in Vulture, Bushwick Daily,The Daily Dot, HelloGiggles, Galore Magazine, Adweek, and CodeBlack Report. Milly can be seen performing at theaters and venues across NYC.


Describe your worst gig.

I did a comedy show after sabbath at an orthodox Jewish family sleep away camp. A dozen men were vaping at the same time. I said the word “underwear” and there were multiple groans.

What were you like as a teen? (Did you have comedy #goals? Were you already funny, or not so much?)

Outgoing and silly, I loved the TV show “Jackass” and swimming in the pool. I was funny but no goals of being a comedian.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Find the right balance between curating your online persona while being vulnerable and real.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

They have no sense of humor.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Having a community of peers that I enjoyed being around.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Overnight sensations are 10 years in the making.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

You must watch “Star Wars” if you wanna do improv.

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

“Wait a second, who ARE you?”

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

Whatever helps you sleep at night.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

I have many aspects of myself and there were a ton of different people who spoke to those different parts of me. I would say the “Blue Collar Comedy Tour” was fun for me as a kid. I know. It’s a lot.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

Humor helps me process traumatic situations and show the ridiculousness of political / pop culture events through satire.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

Scary, overwhelming and empowering all at once.

What single word always cracks you up?

Calling someone a “bozo.”


Connect with Milly on Instagram and Twitter.

 

Mindy Raf pities you (if you think women aren’t funny)

Mindy Raf is a comedian, actress, musician, and published author based in Brooklyn, New York. She has contributed to MTV’s GIRL CODE, COLLEGEHUMOR, TNT, VH1, The Daily Comedy Network, and the MY PARENTS WERE AWESOME anthology. Mindy’s debut young adult novel THE SYMPTOMS OF MY INSANITY (Penguin Random House) is out now. Her critically acclaimed solo show NOT THE ONE: a love story was named an “LBGT Best Bet” by Time Out New York, “hilariously quirky” by Theatre Is Easy, “Barrier Breaking” by The Edinburgh Reporter, and “cheeky and infectious” by Ed Fest Magazine. Mindy has played to a sold out run Off Broadway at 59E59, garnered 4 star reviews the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and has sold out at Brooklyn’s Cloud City, The People’s Improv Theater, The Tank NYC, as well as her guest production residency at NYC’s Theaterlab. As a writer and creative consultant, Mindy is particularly passionate about supporting LGBTQAI+ projects through her company MBR Creative.


Describe your worst gig.

I performed an hour long zoom stand up show with nobody’s cameras or audio on.

What were you like as a teen? (Did you have comedy #goals? Were you already funny, or not so much?)

Insecure, confused, and anxious and very performative. I started in musical theater and was always cast as comic roles versus ingenue, I didn’t embrace it at the time but eventually leaned into and truly enjoyed character acting and comedy.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Your gut knows what’s right for you, what’s funny, what’s true. Don’t ignore it. No matter how much you’re told it’s wrong.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

Pity

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

The thrill of trying out new material and honing writing always kept me wanting to get onstage.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t play it for the laughs, play it for the truth.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t talk about yourself so much.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

Eh. I don’t use it, but to each their own.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

It was a coping mechanism for myself when I was younger, and as an adult I find it’s helpful to make others comfortable or cope with hard situations.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

I’ll answer that as soon as all cis men are asked what it’s like to be a man in comedy.


Connect with Mindy on Instagram, TikTok, and Twitter.



Emily Flake failed at live-cartooning for kids

Emily is a cartoonist-writer-performer-teacher-illustrator based in Brooklyn. She makes cartoons for The New Yorker, mostly, but also sometimes MAD Magazine, the New Statesman, and other places. Emily performs a quarterly-ish show called Shitshow with NPR’s Ophira Eisenberg, and a monthly show called NIGHTMARES with comedian Kat Burdick. Emily is the writer and illustrator behind a book of cartoon essays called Mama Tried It. You can buy it here.


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

Situational. But I once got to shut it down with a “fewer” correction to his “less” (in person, not online! Felt glorious) .

Describe your worst gig.

Technically not even comedy, but still gives me chills – I’d been hired to do a cartooning event with Zach Kanin and we had no idea what we were doing; we got up and ate shit for two solid hours IN FRONT OF KIDS while I watched the project head’s face go from alarm to disappointment to anger. Oof.

What were you like as a teen? (Did you have comedy #goals? Were you already funny, or not so much?)

Pretty droopy with lots of feelings! But I did a fanzine cause I was trying to be #PunkAsFuck and I did funny (?) comics for it.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

KNOW THYSELF (and then I’d die before attributing).

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

Flick ‘em in the nuts and laugh hysterically

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

The sweet sweet irresistible drug of making people laugh.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Comedy, life, anything – be kind and reliable.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

Like being a dude, but moist.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

I actually kind of love it because I used it in an essay about my life goals when I was nine.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian? If so, who, why, how?

JANEANE GAROFOLO. I watched her on MTV’s Half-Hour Comedy Hour, and I think it was a Spring Break edition where she made fun of Gerardo and they booed her; she was a total badass about it, and I just remember watching with my heart pounding and thinking I WANT THIS


Emily is a cartoonist-writer-performer-teacher-illustrator based in Brooklyn. She makes cartoons for The New Yorker, mostly, but also sometimes MAD Magazine, the New Statesman, and other places. Emily performs a quarterly-ish show called Shitshow with NPR’s Ophira Eisenberg, and a monthly show called NIGHTMARES with comedian Kat Burdick. Emily is the writer and illustrator behind a book of cartoon essays called Mama Tried It. You can buy it here.



Carmen Lynch is not wearing yellow

Carmen Lynch is based in NYC and has appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, The Late Show with David LettermanThe Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Conan, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, and more, along with The Good Wife, Inside Amy Schumer, and This Week at the Comedy Cellar. Carmen performed a sold-out run at the 2017 Edinburgh Fringe Festival and has performed for the troops across the Middle East and Africa. Carmen also does standup in Spanish in Spanish-speaking countries. Her comedy album “Dance Like You Don’t Need the Money” was reviewed by The New York Times as “one of five to stream” and voted #1 comedy album in 2017 by SiriusXM.


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

(When they’re on the phone) That better be your babysitter because you’re kids are dead.

Describe your worst gig (noting that you survived).

2 pm, bridal shower, outdoors.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Don’t look behind you. Just look forward. 🙏🏼

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

Awwww…you’re so unhappy inside. Let me give you my therapist’s number.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Some inner voice too powerful to ignore (and I tried.)

Best comedy advice you ever got?

“Have a regular room you can kill in and one you can bomb in.”

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

“Wear this yellow dress on stage.”

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

It helped me break out of my shyness shell.

What single word always cracks you up?

[Lake] Titicaca.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian? If so, who, why, how?

Lucille Ball and Carol Burnett. Watching them let it all out on TV was everything.


Carmen Lynch is based in NYC and has appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, The Late Show with David LettermanThe Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Conan, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, and more, along with The Good Wife, Inside Amy Schumer, and This Week at the Comedy Cellar. Carmen performed a sold-out run at the 2017 Edinburgh Fringe Festival and has performed for the troops across the Middle East and Africa. Carmen also does standup in Spanish in Spanish-speaking countries. Her comedy album “Dance Like You Don’t Need the Money” was reviewed by The New York Times as “one of five to stream” and voted #1 comedy album in 2017 by SiriusXM.

Note from Pam Schuller: Check the genitals

Comedian Pamela Rae Schuller is relentlessly funny with her confessional and brutally honest comedy about being 4 foot 6 ½  and having a whole lot of Tourette Syndrome. Pamela is also the director of HereNow, a Jewish teen mental health initiative that promotes mental health, wellbeing, and resilience through creativity.  Pamela has spoken and performed in six countries, in almost every state in the US, and for more than 35,000 kids, teens, and adults. From squeaky clean comedy to working incredibly blue, Pamela gets audiences of every age comfortable and laughing together through storytelling and humor. You can see her on BuzzFeed, hear her on Sirius XM, check out her writing on Mayim Bialik’s Grok Nation, or catch her on her upcoming tour of the US and Canada with her one woman show “What Makes me Tic”.  See more at PamelaComedy.com or follow her on Twitter and Instagram @PamelaComedy. To learn more about HereNow, check out www.ProjectHereNow.org 


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

It’s really hard to troll me because I will give you immediate feedback on your trolling/heckling skills. Sometimes I will even provide pointers to troll me better…if you are going to be a troll, be the BEST troll you can be.

Describe your worst gig.

It was a show at a big comedy club in the middle of a small town in the midwest. It was for three shows in one night. The early show was sold out and amazing, the late show was also great, but the late-late show had 4 people – in a club that seated probably 500. Right before they called me to the stage, 3 people left to go smoke outside and one went to the bathroom so I got up on stage in a huge theater performing for NOBODY. I basically performed for the waitstaff.

What were you like as a teen?

I was a tough teen, besides having Tourette Syndrome, I was angry, depressed and pushing the world away from me. My humor and snark were blanketed by meanness and anger. I was kicked out of public school and shipped away to boarding school for weird artsy kids (which I loved). My boarding school saw something in me and signed me up for a comedy and improv class and it clicked immediately and that allowed me to channel my energy into something way more fun and productive. I started opening for comics I respected by the end of high school and I knew it was my path ever since.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

You do you. It’s so easy to see comics you respect and admire and try to be more like them but instead, learn from how amazing they are and try and be more like yourself.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

Somebody said that to me this week and with a straight face I said, “that’s why I ALWAYS double check genitals before I decide if I am going to laugh.”

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

People sometimes feel the need to talk about your gender as they bring you to the stage “next up we have a female comic!” and that will never make any sense to me. Sometimes I am met with people saying things like, “oh, you are the female on the show!” as though there is this unspoken quota. But honestly, I love being a woman in comedy. I love a good challenge and being funny on stage makes me feel powerful.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Find your own path. There is no one way to be a comic. I make a living with a one-woman show and motivational speaking that combines comedy and storytelling. I never even knew this was even a career path but I followed my passions and figured I would figure something out!

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Somebody once told me not to talk about Tourettes on stage because people don’t want to feel bad for me. That doesn’t make any sense. We all have struggles and stand up is where you can turn those into COMEDY.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Lynne Koplitz took me to dinner during my senior year of college after I opened for her. I don’t remember her exact words but it was basically that if comedy is in my heart this much, I was meant to be doing it.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

Work hard. Write, re-write, film your sets, do that until you get a good one that you can share to get a booked show. Make friends in comedy. Comics book shows and the more your friends see you working hard and improving, the more they will book you. Love the journey. When you see somebody who has what seems like an overnight success, know they were actually working their butt off for YEARS.



Comedian Pamela Rae Schuller is relentlessly funny with her confessional and brutally honest comedy about being 4 foot 6 ½  and having a whole lot of Tourette Syndrome. Pamela is also the director of HereNow, a Jewish teen mental health initiative that promotes mental health, wellbeing, and resilience through creativity.  Pamela has spoken and performed in six countries, in almost every state in the US, and for more than 35,000 kids, teens, and adults. From squeaky clean comedy to working incredibly blue, Pamela gets audiences of every age comfortable and laughing together through storytelling and humor. You can see her on BuzzFeed, hear her on Sirius XM, check out her writing on Mayim Bialik’s Grok Nation, or catch her on her upcoming tour of the US and Canada with her one woman show “What Makes me Tic”.  See more at PamelaComedy.com or follow her on Twitter and Instagram @PamelaComedy. To learn more about HereNow, check out www.ProjectHereNow.org 

 

 

Jaye McBride hits on hecklers

Jaye McBride is funny, smart and proudly transgender. Jaye has traveled the world performing stand-up comedy. Jaye has been a part of The Boston Comedy Festival, The Maine Comedy Festival and the She Devil Comedy Festival. In addition to stand-up, Jaye has written, produced and acted in a variety of short films. When not performing on-stage or on-screen Jaye writes “The Comedy Blog” for the Times Union and speaks at colleges all across the country with her lecture about being transgender.


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

If it’s a guy, I hit on him. Nothing funnier than watching a bro squirm from getting hit on by a tranny comedian. That guy won’t laugh but everyone else will.

Describe your worst gig.

One of my first road gigs was in Pottsville, PA. It was a four-hour drive and when we finally got into town, we decided to hit a strip mall to use the bathroom and eat something. The very first person I saw (Pottsvillian?) had a giant swastika tattoo on his forearm. I looked at the other guys and just said, “I’ll be in the car.”

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

It’s such a great defense mechanism. If you can make a high school bully laugh, he might not shove you into a locker. And if he does, at least you can still crack yourself up about it.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Be nice That sounds corny, especially since I’m usually the most miserable person in any room. (The mention of ‘deathbed’ makes me feel warm and fuzzy. Literally, it’s on my vision board as ‘the sweet release only death will bring’.) If you’re a dick, you won’t get brought back to many shows so be nice.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

To drop an anvil on his head. The truth is when someone says that, they’re really saying, “I refuse to believe women are funny and won’t give you a chance.” Fuck him, I don’t have to prove shit to that asshole.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Having nothing else in my life. Pathetic, I know.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Literally everything Gary Gulman has ever tweeted.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t talk about being trans.

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Network! Just hang out with other comics because people book comics they know. And if you’re hanging out and still not getting booked, produce your own show and make them come to you.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

It makes me want to vomette in my toilette because of the irritationne.

What single word always cracks you up?

Fart. (Mine, not yours)

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

Jake Johannsen. I saw him on Letterman years ago when I was a kid and just knew I wanted to be like him. Well, professionally, not anatomically

photo via Jaye McBride


Jaye McBride is funny, smart and proudly transgender. Jaye has traveled the world performing stand-up comedy. Jaye has been a part of The Boston Comedy Festival, The Maine Comedy Festival and the She Devil Comedy Festival. In addition to stand-up, Jaye has written, produced and acted in a variety of short films. When not performing on-stage or on-screen Jaye writes “The Comedy Blog” for the Times Union and speaks at colleges all across the country with her lecture about being transgender.

Drae Campbell pro tip: Burn it to the ground

inDrae has an eclectic career as an EMCEE, comedian, director, actor, storyteller and all around entertainer. Drae received a BFA in Theater from the University of The Arts in Philadelphia. Drae has appeared on many stages and screens all over but mostly in New York City. Drae hosts and curates a live monthly show called TELL. TELL is a queer storytelling show that happens every month at The Bureau Of General Services Queer Division and is now a Podcast. Follow Drae here!


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

“We’re not a monolith.”

Describe your worst gig.

I was working at Sesame Place theme park hosting a ‘Chromakey’ show. One of the little kids who volunteered to come on stage to participate got her hair tangled in the wheels of a little go kart prop. I panicked and started cracking jokes about “untangling this hairy situation.” She started crying. The dad had to come on stage and pull her hair out of the wheels. Eventually we all got through it. I had to do the same shows over and over all day long when I worked there and it was actually a good exercise for figuring out how to have fun and stay present and hit marks.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Burn it to the ground.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

To pull a coin out of their ear and say, “but what about THIS”!

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

I actually wanted to distance myself a bit from the stand up world because everyone seemed so depressed and I didn’t want to be a part of it. I focused mainly on my acting career. I started doing stand up again because the culture around it on and off stage started to change a little. It’s more diverse and there are less rape jokes. The format has expanded and that’s exciting to me.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Do as many shows as you can a week. Learn how to read the room.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

If someone asks you to take off your clothes, you take off your clothes.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

Same thing it’s like to be a woman anywhere. Dangerous.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

Real actual talk: I’ve had a lot of trauma. Laughter and jokes are the primary ways I’ve been able to process and survive. Also, ladies seem to enjoy laughing so, that works out nice for me. Cuz I date ladies.

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Observe and ask questions. Find out who knows who and who runs what. Off stage, lean into communicating without trying to be funny necessarily . Always ask — even if you think someone is a big shot. The worst that can happen is they say no. Connecting with people is key. Be kind to folks. Always. Be considerate and timely, but don’t cheat yourself. If you feels someone is being shady or shitty, let them know and let others know. Go with your gut.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

My mom. Making her laugh was fun. Her laughter was infectious and it brought us together as a family.

What single word always cracks you up?

Muffin.


Drae has an eclectic career as an EMCEE, comedian, director, actor, storyteller and all around entertainer. Drae received a BFA in Theater from the University of The Arts in Philadelphia. Drae has appeared on many stages and screens all over but mostly in New York City. Drae hosts and curates a live monthly show called TELL. TELL is a queer storytelling show that happens every month at The Bureau Of General Services Queer Division and is now a Podcast. Follow Drae here!

Somebody bring Mary Beth Barone a hair tie

Mary Beth Barone is a Manhattan-based comedian, writer, and actor. She was recently named one of Comedy Central’s Up Next and performed at their Clusterfest showcase in June 2019. Mary Beth can be seen hosting her monthly stand-up show at Peppi’s Cellar with Benito Skinner or at PUBLIC hotel in New York City, where she has a stand-up residency. She also hosts Drag His Ass: A F*ckboy Treatment Program, a show she feels very strongly about. Mary Beth currently hosts/produces the podcast Mildly Offensive. Check out her upcoming appearances here, and follow her!


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

Can you shut up?

Describe your worst gig.

I did survive a terrible set in Bushwick. The host brought me up as “the person who caused 9/11” and then the microphone broke in the middle of my set. I bombed HARD!

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Do the work, speak your truth, and f*ck everything else!

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

The unconditional support of my friends and family.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Try to learn one thing from every performance.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

A random audience member once followed me outside of a club after my set to tell me he really enjoyed my comedy but then proceeded to give me notes on some of my jokes. He said “you should be writing this down.” Mhm sure thing.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

I love it except when I’m the only girl on a lineup and I need a hair-tie.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

We don’t use that word in my house 🙂

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

Flirting is easier now to be honest! It’s always been good to bring a levity to certain situations but I’ve definitely had many moments of putting my foot in my mouth.

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Get a great tape you are proud of and don’t be shy about sharing it.

What single word always cracks you up?

Smegma. I’m disgusting.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

My journey in comedy started because of a few different people and circumstances. Watching Broad City inspired me to take improv at UCB and watching Inside Amy Schumer was the kick I needed to try stand-up. So I guess you could say without Comedy Central, I wouldn’t be here!


Mary Beth Barone is a Manhattan-based comedian, writer, and actor. She was recently named one of Comedy Central’s Up Next and performed at their Clusterfest showcase in June 2019. Mary Beth can be seen hosting her monthly stand-up show at Peppi’s Cellar with Benito Skinner or at PUBLIC hotel in New York City, where she has a stand-up residency. She also hosts Drag His Ass: A F*ckboy Treatment Program, a show she feels very strongly about. Mary Beth currently hosts/produces the podcast Mildly Offensive. Check out her upcoming appearances here, and follow her!