Mini Q&A with Allison Summers

Allison Summers is an improviser, comedian, and writer based out of Nashville, TN. She has written for theBerry and has performed with the Second City, iO West, and with the Upright Citizens Brigade. Her one-woman show, Collections, is currently running at Third Coast Comedy Club.

Favorite response to a heckler?

I’m sorry you’re hurting on the inside. Which parent didn’t love you? Oh shit, was it both?

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young (female/LGBTQI) comedian?

Fuck it and fuck them. You are enough.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

You will never be able to make everyone in the audience laugh.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Moving to Nashville will kill my comedy career.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

I am in the recovery community and I teach improv to recovering addicts and alcoholics. It has helped me find a way to be of service to that community and help those who are struggling learn how to laugh again.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

I had really great teachers at The Second City who were very encouraging. My closest friends were involved in comedy as well so it was the biggest part of my life and community.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

It’s a tie between Viki Lawrence and Damon Wayans. I loved Mama’s Family and really believed that she was this old woman and Damon Wayans put together this brilliant and edgey show that housed amazing comedians. It was my dream as a child to be on In Living Color.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

I have never heard this before, I had to google it. After knowing what it is for twenty seconds- I hate it.


Allison Summers is an actress and writer performing and working in Nashville, Tennessee. She is a graduate of The Second City Conservatory, IO West, and UCB Theatre. She has written for the female version of theChive, theBerry, and her one woman show, “Collections,”  has been performed at Out Of Bounds Comedy Festival in Austin, Women in Comedy Festival in Boston and Los Angeles. Currently, she teaches improv classes at Third Coast Comedy Club in Nashville.


CARSEN SMITH (intern, branding and content) performs standup and improv in New York City. She co-created the improvised cooking show “I’ll Have What She’s Having,” which ran at Nashville’s Third Coast Comedy Club. @carsenasmith

Mini Q&A with Abby Sher

Abby Sher is a comedian, improviser, and author currently living in New Jersey. She was a member of the celebrated Second City comedy troupe in Chicago, before moving to Brooklyn, New York, and becoming a freelance writer. Her latest book ALL THE WAYS THE WORLD CAN END is available everywhere. Not to mention she’s a friend of GOLD Comedy!

Favorite response to a heckler?

Hey, is that my rabbi?

BRIEFLY describe your worst gig.

Doing a comedy show at a country club and for our intro they announced all the members who had recently died.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young (female/LGBTQI) comedian?

BE LOUD!

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

Start making monkey noises and throwing things.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

An old grumpy man who told me to stop being small.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

Vaginas have all the fun.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

Gilda Radner – her wild leaping into walls, her Jewess jeans and gum smacks. Her raw honesty.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

Needs to come with cheese to be worthwhile.


Abby Sher is a writer and performer whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times,Self, Jane, Elle, and Redbook. She is also the author of Breaking Free: True Stories of Girls Who Escaped Modern Slavery, Amen, Amen, Amen: Memoir of a Girl Who Couldn’t Stop Praying, and Kissing Snowflakes. Abby has written and performed for the Second City in Chicago and the Upright Citizen’s Brigade and Magnet Theater in New York. She lives in New Jersey with her family.

Twitter: @abbysher


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CARSEN SMITH (intern, branding and content) performs standup and improv in New York City. She co-created the improvised cooking show “I’ll Have What She’s Having,” which ran at Nashville’s Third Coast Comedy Club. @carsenasmith

Mini Q&A with Cathy Ladman

Cathy Ladman’s show is a self-probing vehicle which draws laughter from exposing personal neuroses. She has not only appeared on “The Tonight Show” nine times, but was also the only female comic to appear on the last two of Johnny Carson’s “Tonight Show Anniversary” shows. She’s made four appearances, thus far, on “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson,” did her own HBO “One Night Stand” comedy special, and was awarded the American Comedy Award for Best Female Stand Up Comic.

Favorite response to a heckler?

It seems like you don’t get enough attention in your life. I think I know why.

BRIEFLY describe your worst gig (noting that you survived).

About a year into my doing standup, I was onstage, the audience chattering got louder and louder, and finally, people began throwing things onstage. I said, “Thank you,” and left the stage. Note: NEVER say, “Thank you,” to an audience that throws things at you!!!!!

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

“Wow. You’re still saying that? Poor you.”

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

My mentor, who told me that tenacity was 99% of everything.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t worry about who you are onstage for the first year or more. Just get as much stage time as you can.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

You need to get dirty for certain crowds. “Throw in a few ‘fucks.'”

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

People are always attracted to funny people. You can get your message across so much more easily when it’s funny and entertaining.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

Mike Nichols & Elaine May’s album, “Nichols & May Examine Doctors.” I was drawn to it at about 8 years of age. It was an innate response. I just got it. And I watched all the standup comics on Ed Sullivan and decided that that was what I wanted to do. Robert Klein and George Carlin. Thinking comedians all.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

HATE it. We’re not the diminutive version of a comic. We’re comedians, or comics.


Cathy Ladman is an acclaimed television and film actor. Her film credits include “Charlie Wilson’s War,” “The Aristocrats,” and “White Oleander.” Her TV appearances include “Mad Men,” “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” and “Everybody Loves Raymond.” She’s done several TV pilots, including “Caroline in the City,” in which she had a recurring role, and a bunch of others that barely saw the light of day (or night). She also appeared regularly on ABC’s “Politically Incorrect” and Comedy Central’s “Dr. Katz: Professional Therapist.”

Website: www.cathyladman.com

Twitter: CathyLadman

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CARSEN SMITH (intern, branding and content) performs standup and improv in New York City. She co-created the improvised cooking show “I’ll Have What She’s Having,” which ran at Nashville’s Third Coast Comedy Club. @carsenasmith

Mini Q&A with Giulia Rozzi

Giulia Rozzi is a writer, comedian, actress and very emotional person that was raised in Boston by two adorable Italian immigrants that let her watch Benny Hill when she was three. She currently performs all over the country and as an active member of the NYC standup scene.

 

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

I don’t even hear them anymore.

 

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

People coming up to me after shows or emailing me and saying “I really related to you” or “you made me feel better.” That connection is so fulfilling and wonderful.

 

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t worry about what other people are doing.

 

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

It’s helped add light to tough situations and allowed me to share dark stories and thoughts without taking myself so seriously. I learned this at a very early age- whenever my family fights we always make fun of one another to ease tension, it’s sort of our way of apologizing and saying “you pissed me off but I still love you.”

 

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

I can’t pick one, it’s two- my dad and mom, two of the funniest people I know.

 


Giulia Rozzi has been featured as a TEDx speaker, a Moth GrandSLAM champion and one of BUST Magazine’s 10 Funny Ladies You Need To Be Watching Right Now. She’s been seen on Chelsea Lately, Comedy Central’s This Is Not Happening, SeeSo’s Night Train Show and The Guest List. and several talking head shows on Vh1, TruTv, Lifetime and Playboy TV. Her album True Love was released on Comedy Records last winter and was recently named one of SiriusXM Comedy’s top albums of 2016 and one of The Comedy Bureau’s 100 Best Things in Comedy in 2016.

Website: giuliarozzi.com

Twitter: Giulia Rozzi

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What’s your sense of humor?

Just like a fingerprint, no two people have the exact same sense of humor. Humor is a very fluid and flexible personality trait that is constantly changing and adapting to new life experiences. What one person finds hilarious might make someone else incredibly uncomfortable. You know this if you’ve ever seen George W. Bush try to give a neck massage.

This quiz is designed to see which of the 6 main styles of humor—we’ll call them observational, satire, deadpan, dark, surreal, and slapstick—tickles your funny bone. It certainly doesn’t mean that this is the only kind of humor that works. (And it also doesn’t mean that there are only 6 styles of humor!) But it might give you a bit of a clue about what your own comedy style might be, which is can be a key element of your comedy persona. At very least,  it might point you in the direction of some awesome new comedians, movies, and shows to check out.

1. What’s your favorite punchline?

2. Favorite comedian?

3. What’s the deal with…?

4. Favorite SNL sketch?

5. What do you do to lighten a mood?

Find your funny: What kind of humor are you?
Surreal (absurdism)

Surreal humor (also known as absurdist humor) is a form of humor predicated on deliberate violations of causal reasoning, producing events and behaviors that are obviously illogical. Constructions of surreal humor tend to involve bizarre juxtapositions, non-sequiturs, irrational or absurd situations and expressions of nonsense. Comedians we bet you’ll like: Maria Bamford, Monty Python, Dan Harmon, Tim & Eric, Steven Wright, Coen Brothers. Shows and movies we bet you’ll like: Unbreakable Kimmie Schmidt, SpongeBob SquarePants, The Big Lebowski, The Eric Andre Show, Pee-wee’s Big Adventure, Spaceballs, The Good Place, Community.
Dark (black comedy)

Dark comedy (or black comedy) is a comic style that makes light of subject matter that is generally considered taboo. This type of humor often includes topics of violence, discrimination, disease, sexuality, religion and barbarism. Comedians we bet you’ll like: Sarah Silverman, Jim Norton, Anthony Jeselnik, Richard Pryor, Seth MacFarlane, Trey Parker & Matt Stone. Shows and movies we bet you’ll like: South Park, Four Lions, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Rick and Morty, Inglorious Basterds.
Satire

In satire, vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement. This style of humor is often constructive social criticism, using wit to draw attention to both particular and wider issues in society. Comedians we bet you’ll like: Gilda Radner, Conan O’Brien, Amy Sedaris, Dave Chappelle, W. Kamau Bell, Sarah Silverman, Samantha Bee. Shows and movies we bet you’ll like: SNL, Blazing Saddles, The Daily Show, 30 Rock, Wet Hot American Summer, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee.
Observational

Observational comedy is a form of humor based on the commonplace aspects of everyday life. It is one of the main types of humor in stand-up comedy. In an observational comedy act the comedian "makes an observation about something from the backwaters of life, an everyday phenomenon that is rarely noticed or discussed." Comedians we bet you’ll like: Amy Schumer, Louis C.K., Joan Rivers, Kevin Hart, John Mulaney, Ali Wong, Phoebe Robinson. Shows and movies we bet you’ll like: Get Out, Brooklyn 99, Seinfeld, Arrested Development, Bridesmaids, Master of None.
Deadpan (dry)

Deadpan (or dry humor) describes the deliberate display of a lack of or no emotion, commonly as a form of comedic delivery to contrast with the ridiculousness of the subject matter. The delivery is meant to be blunt, sarcastic, laconic, or apparently unintentional. Comedians we bet you’ll like: Tig Notaro, Steven Wright, Mindy Kaling, Mitch Hedberg, Aubrey Plaza, Bob Newhart. Shows and movies we bet you’ll like: Portlandia, The Office, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Documentary Now!, In Bruges.
Slapstick (physical)

Slapstick is a style of humor involving exaggerated physical activity which exceeds the boundaries of normal physical comedy. Comedians we bet you’ll like: Melissa McCarthy, Buster Keaton, Jim Carrey, Lucille Ball, The Three Stooges, Martin Short, Molly Shannon. Shows and movies we bet you’ll like: Laverne and Shirley, Naked Gun, Airplane, Family Guy, There’s Something About Mary, Modern Family.

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CARSEN SMITH (intern, branding and content) performs standup and improv in New York City. She co-created the improvised cooking show “I’ll Have What She’s Having,” which ran at Nashville’s Third Coast Comedy Club. @carsenasmith

Mini Q&A with Corinne Fisher

Corinne Fisher is one half of Sorry About Last Night…, her comedy writing and performance duo with Krystyna Hutchinson. In December 2013, the duo launched Guys We Fucked: The Anti Slut-Shaming Podcast that now boasts a million+ listeners worldwide. the podcast is consistently ranked among the Top 5 comedy podcasts on iTunes (but has reached as high as #1) and has been featured on The Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, Splitsider, and more. Over the past few years, Corinne has been selected to perform in the prestigious Boston Comedy Festival, the Women in Comedy Festival, The Laughing Devil Comedy Festival, the She-Devil Festival, and the prestigious Just For Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal.

 

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

I don’t acknowledge hecklers or trolls unless absolutely necessary because that’s what they want, they’re there to gaslight. I treat them the same way I would treat a child having a temper tantrum — keep doing what I’m doing.

 

BRIEFLY describe your worst gig (noting that you survived).

It’s comedy so every gig is at the same time the best and worst experience of your life. The worst one in recent history is where someone literally handed me a used hairbrush at a serious sit-down dinner party and told me it was time to “do my thing”. Can you imagine doing that to any other kind of performer? It would just never fucking happen.

 

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Me. I wanted it. I still want it. You have to keep wanting it.

 

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

If you’re serious about being a comic, you should be comfortable identifying as a comic before anything else.

 

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

To find out what experiences they’ve had to make them think that. I certainly don’t believe that to be true, but also that notion doesn’t come from nowhere. Instead of sassily telling someone with that belief off, I’d like to truly get to the root of their thinking and nip it in the bud once and for all.

 

Best comedy advice you ever got?

“Don’t hate yourself in front of the audience. Go backstage and hate yourself.” -Will Hines, teacher at UCB

 

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

“Don’t talk about fucking guys so much.” -old dude club owner who shall remain unnamed

 

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

Being funny has helped me charm my way into jobs and get me out of trouble, but it’s also definitely lost me jobs and gotten me into a ton more trouble…

 

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

I’ve been asked this so much and honestly it’s just like being anyone else in comedy — fucking miserable.

 

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

There were many, but I was deeply inspired by John Leguizamo’s one man shows. I had never seen anything so real, so raw, and so narcissistic — I thought to myself, “that’s what I need to do.”

 

For standups: what advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Be out on the scene every night — whether you’re on stage or in the audience supporting your fellow comics. And produce your own show (just make sure you do the work so that audience shows up, creating a Facebook event is only one small part of running a successful show).

 

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

It just needn’t exist. It’s reinforcing to the audience that there is indeed some difference between a comic with a penis and a comic without one. A comic is a comic, no matter what’s in your pants.

 


Corinne Fisher is a stand-up comedian, writer & actor originally from Union, NJ. She first made a splash with her debut one-woman show Corinne Fisher: I STALK YOU (Dir. David Crabb) which had a run at The Peoples Improv Theater (The PIT) in the Summer of 2010 and was featured in Time Out New York. Since then, she has been a regular on the stand-up scene playing anything from dive bars to world-famous comedy clubs like New York Comedy Club, The Stand, The Standing Room, Caroline’s, Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, Broadway Comedy Club, Comix, Laugh Boston, The Stress Factory & Gotham.

Website: http://www.corinnefisher.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PhilanthropyGal

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Mini Q&A with Carole Montgomery

Carole Montgomery is a longtime standup comedian based out of Brooklyn, NY. Since starring in two Las Vegas shows, Carole founded the National Mom Comedy Tour, a series of standup comedy shows that brings laughs to VFW posts, American legions, and military bases.

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

You should have been a blow job.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

There was nothing else I wanted to be, I had no choice but to stick with it.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Don’t take anything personal and just keep pushing through the barriers.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t worry about people stealing your jokes, they can’t steal you. Sinbad told me that.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

You shouldn’t be dirty, you’re too pretty for that.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

It’s helped me in times of grief too many times to count. In tragedy you have to laugh.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

Yawn.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

Harpo, Groucho, Freddie Prinze, Richard Pryor & George Carlin all had something to do with why I became a comic. And my dad, he was the one who could walk into a room and light up a crowd.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

I was always considered a comedian by my peers, probably cause they knew I’d kick their ass if they called me anything else.


Carole Montgomery, with over 2 dozen television credits to her name, is a respected veteran of the standup comedy scene nationwide. In addition to her numerous TV appearances, she has headlined clubs & colleges across the USA and starred in 2 different Las Vegas production shows. In her ten years as a Las Vegas star, it is estimated that she has been seen by over 5 million audience members. Besides being a comedian and writer, Carole is a wife and mother. She’s been married for 30 years and has a 23 year old son, Layne. She was Vice-President of her son’s school PTA and helped coach his Little League team for 7 years. She is now dealing with an adult son leaving home, her Peter Pan husband and living with her mother-in-law. The jokes write themselves.

Website: http://www.carolemontgomery.com/

Twitter: @nationalmom

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CARSEN SMITH (intern, branding and content) performs standup and improv in New York City. She co-created the improvised cooking show “I’ll Have What She’s Having,” which ran at Nashville’s Third Coast Comedy Club. @carsenasmith

Mini Q&A with Kerry Coddett

Kerry Coddett [Cah-dit] is a New York- based comedian, actress, and writer. Born and raised in Brooklyn to Caribbean parents, Kerry draws comedic inspiration from her colorful surroundings and offers a uniquely unapologetic perspective that is both irreverent and insightful.

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

“Let me do my job. I don’t come to the grocery store and tell you how to pack bags, do I?”

BRIEFLY describe your worst gig (noting that you survived).

One time I was telling jokes at a bar in Brooklyn and I was destroying a heckler. He then got up from his seat and walked onto the stage, and which point we almost got into a physical altercation. It took way too long for the host and the other male comics to come to my rescue!

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young (female/LGBTQI) comedian?

Don’t be a hack. Find your truth and speak to it. And the closer your jokes are to you and your life experiences, the better you’ll become.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

I say people aren’t funny. Comedy is hard no matter what sits in between your legs.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

If you are undeniable, you will not be denied.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

I get away with murder in real life. I’m brutally honest to strangers and family members, and because I’m funny—I can get away with saying things that most people would never dare to.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”? (If applicable.)

It’s like being a woman anywhere.

For standups: what advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Making “friends,” networking, asking for spots and including tape to those who are unfamiliar with you. Hang out at shows that you think you can get booked on. Show face and support. Be seen around the scene, and ASK for spots. Closed mouths don’t get fed!

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

I hate it. There’s no need to feminize that word. I don’t tell jokes from my vagina. I love being a woman, and I love doing comedy—but unless I’m doing something that is specifically targeted or geared towards being a woman, there’s no need for people to have to infer what gender I am from my job title. It’s irrelevant.


CARSEN SMITH (intern, branding and content) performs standup and improv in New York City. She co-created the improvised cooking show “I’ll Have What She’s Having,” which ran at Nashville’s Third Coast Comedy Club. @carsenasmith

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Mini Q&A with Ophira Eisenberg

Ophira Eisenberg is the host of NPR’s and WNYC’s new weekly trivia, puzzle, and game show Ask Me Another. She recently performed on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson and her book debut memoir, Screw Everyone: Sleeping My Way to Monogamy is available everywhere. Check her out this summer at Brooklyn’s Union Hall!

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

What are you my mother?

Describe your worst gig.

It was my first paid road gig – at a strip club that was dark on Mondays (like Broadway) so the owner didn’t advertise the show and no one came. To try to save it, he called the strippers and they showed up with their boyfriends and friends. I died pretty hard on that stage, with that audience. But I did get $20.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young (female/LGBTQI) comedian?

Just. Keep. Going.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

What is this 2004? We’re done with that. Proven it a 1000 times over so step aside and let me do my job, you go back to your shitty life/cave.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Delusion.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Wash your hands. Ha. But seriously – meet you audience after the show, shake their hands, but then wash your hands.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

“Your act should be more angry.”

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

Very lucrative.

Single word that always cracks you up?

Puke. Sorry. But yup. I’m as low brow as the next person.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian? If so, who, why, how?

Sigh, my mom, my brother. And then Carol Burnett.

For standups: what advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual spots?

It’s really a game of perseverance and having a consistently good set.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

I wrote an entire chapter in my book about how much I hate it, but in short, we play the same drunk crowds, we deal with the same bookers. I’m a comic, just like you.


Ophira Eisenberg is a Canadian comic, writer, and actress from Calgary, now living in New York City. When she’s not hosting her weekly NPR show, Ask Me Another, you can find her at pretty much any club around New York City, and at exclusive venues and bars when she tours on the road. Her tour schedule can be found here.

Twitter: @OphiraE

Facebook: Ophira Eisenberg

CARSEN SMITH (intern, branding and content) performs standup and improv in New York City. She co-created the improvised cooking show “I’ll Have What She’s Having,” which ran at Nashville’s Third Coast Comedy Club. @carsenasmith

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Mini Q&A with Elsa Waithe

Elsa Waithe is a comedian, activist, and all-around wildchild. Her comedy is a mix of light-hearted but critical jabs at homosexuality and race but mainly herself and weed. She can been seen as a regular performer (and producer) at the Cinder Block Festival and in her feature on an episode of the This American Life podcast. She is also an instructor and incredible supporter of GOLD Comedy!

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

This ain’t a conversation.

BRIEFLY describe your worst gig (noting that you survived).

The worst gigs are when you know you are doing A+ material and it’s all falling flat. I push through finish and remind myself that no matter how bad it was, it’s over and I did it.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young (female/LGBTQI) comedian?

Take all the advice but only listen to half of it.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

First: ಠ_ಠ
Then: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
There’s way too many funny women out there, past/present/future to really argue this with anyone. Can’t argue that the sky is blue with someone determined to see it as green.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Competition with myself and camaraderie.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Never throw anything away but don’t get married to any one bit.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Go to as many open mics as you can. (Don’t do that. Burnout is real.)

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”? (If applicable.)

Answering this question, or it’s racial or sexual variate (“What’s it like to be Black/lesbian…) in every interview as if I’m not supposed to be here.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

I’ve had cops recognize me from a show. He took selfies with me and forgot to write my ticket.

Single word that always cracks you up?

Spork

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian? If so, who, why, how?

I was watching The View one day (it was just on and I didn’t change the channel) and one of the ladies was describing how she was on vacation and afraid to skydive or something. She finally bit off the courage and it was one of the most rewarding things she’d experienced. She said “Whatever you are afraid of, it’s probably the thing you should be doing.” That quote never left me. A week later I was doing stand-up.

For standups: what advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Network, Network, NETWORK.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

I personally don’t like it but I’m not grabbing the pitchforks or torches.


Read Elsa’s bio here. 

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